NARRATIVE: A Law of Nature

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Alfa-Romeo (Type 105) Giulia Sprint GT by Gruppo Bertone

The progress of humankind makes it unnatural for parents to outlive their children. Children are meant to outlive their parents – the people responsible for their conception and upbringing. Children are meant to be the embodiment of the traditions that came before them. However, being the embodiment of traditions is not enough. The instinctive nature of human beings to stay alive is also responsible for the spark of genius that makes it possible for the next generation of offspring to supersede the efforts of their parents in every facet of life. This is not only responsible for the conservation of the human race, but it is also responsible for keeping family trees intact.

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Progress can also be seen as a bridge. Each bridge is unique to each generation of a family, and for progress to succeed, each generation of a family must be responsible for crossing their own bridge.

Anyone who has been alive for long enough understands that life does not always go according to plan. Similarly, there are times when the law of nature – a law that makes it impossible for parents to outlive their children – does not follow through for a family. The worst thing that can happen to a family is for children to pass away before their parents. Conversely, the success of a family can be equally compromised by the failure of the parents to adequately transfer all of their wisdom to their children. People who are responsible for the life of another human being tend to believe that providing tangible pieces of proof – demonstrating their care for their children – is enough. However, delving into the mind of a child and transplanting generational traditions and wisdom is equally important.

The act of transplanting generational traditions and wisdom into the mind of a child is often left neglected because of the barrage of necessities parents need to provide their children with. As a result, the one thing that parents find themselves in the most desperate need of is time. However, in order for children to value the existence of the pair of people responsible for their conception, those people need to spend time tending to the needs of their children in their formative years. This is what results in the accumulated experiences of the lives of every person, which remind them of the significance of the people responsible for bringing them to this earth. When parents fail to spend this time with their children, their existence fades into oblivion. This is where the tragedy of children disregarding their parents begins to take its form.

The moment parents begin to neglect the emotional and psychological development of their children, the fabric that holds families together begins to degrade. In some cases, reversing the mistakes of a family history might take two generations. The first generation may need to make the sacrifice of dealing with the mistakes of the generation that came before, while the next generation will have to build on the successes of their predecessors – proving to their ancestors that their efforts were not in vain. In rare cases, children do successfully reverse the mistakes of their family histories through an external source of inspiration; motivating them to do what nobody in the history of their families has ever imagined.

Cases where an individual rewrites the history of their family for the better are not without their own faults. No matter how much one person can do, the imperfections of a family history will still remain. This can be thought of as a piece of cloth that has been patched together multiple times. Even though the fabric has been made whole again, nothing can be done to disguise the damage caused to the integrity of that material. The material still bears the evidence of its abuse. There are other cases where the fabric that holds a family together degrades to the extent where nothing can be done to repair it. This is when family legacies are left with no hope to thrive; dooming families to the grave with no return and family legacies die.

As the successor to the Alfa-Romeo Giulietta Sprint, the Alfa-Romeo Giulia Sprint GT follows this law of nature. Much like the Giulietta that preceded it, this car was the aftermath of Alfa-Romeo after World War II – an era that demanded vehicles that were mass produced and affordable for all the masses. This singular objective culminated in the creation of this duo of vehicles – built with engines featuring small fuel capacities and boasting four cylinders each. This was an objective that parallels the contemporary necessity for families to treasure their traditions as their families progress from one generation to the next – a necessity that is being neglected in our modern society.

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“Much like the Giulietta that preceded it, this car was the aftermath of Alfa-Romeo after World War II – an era that demanded vehicles that were mass produced and affordable for all the masses.”

Both the Alfa-Romeo Giulietta Sprint and the Alfa-Romeo Giulia Sprint GT saw the expansion of Bertone – the company responsible for the design of their bodywork. Prior to being contracted to work on the Giulietta, Bertone existed as a small-scale workshop with the design and development of the Giulia being a major breakthrough for them at the time. This expansion forms part of the life story of the Alfa-Romeo Giulia GT, a story that underlies every aspect of life, which adheres to the need for progress – an aspect of human life which obeys the laws of nature.

“Both the Alfa-Romeo Giulietta Sprint and the Alfa-Romeo Giulia Sprint GT saw the expansion of Bertone – the company responsible for the design of their bodywork. This expansion forms part of the life story of the Alfa-Romeo Giulia GT, a story that underlies every aspect of life, which adheres to the need for progress – an aspect of human life which obeys the laws of nature.”

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